Missions
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Who We Are

Who We Are

Karl grew up in New Hampshire with his parents and younger brother.  Through the ministry of a Presbyterian church youth group, he became a Christian and received a solid foundation in the faith.  During college, Karl was actively involved as a student leader with InterVarsity Christian Fellowship and got his first taste of missions through a short-term trip to Poland.  Following graduation, Karl briefly worked for a publishing company before heading to Thailand for two and a half years to teach English and aid with evangelism and discipleship as part of an OMF church planting team.   Karl earned a Masters of Divinity (M.Div) at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary and a Master of Theology (Th.M) at Talbot School of Theology, Biola University. He is an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA).

Sun and her family fled from the killing fields of Cambodia and arrived as refugees in California.  Sun heard the Gospel in Sunday school and later prayed to receive Christ.  After high school, Sun sensed the Lord calling her into missions and pursued a degree in Biblical Studies from Biola University.  Following graduation, Sun went on a short-term mission trip to Cambodia and then taught elementary school for a few years before returning to Asia to teach English in Laos.  During her four years in Laos, she also earned an M.A. in TESOL through Azusa Pacific University.  After Laos, Sun sensed God leading her to a very large Asian country where served for two years.  Sun and her team shared the Gospel with top university students and partnered with churches.

Karl and Sun met in Colorado at OMF’s Candidate Course for new missionaries and were married in 2005. They have three children, Joshua, Caitlin, and John.  They did church planting ministry in Central Thailand during their first missionary term and are now located in Bangkok where Karl teaches part-time at Bangkok Bible Seminary, and assists with editing and translation of Thai Christian books at Kanok Bannasan (OMF Publishers Thailand).

What We Do

What We Do

Karl teaches church history and missions at Bangkok Bible Seminary, and assists with translation and editing at Kanok Bannasan (OMF Publishers Thailand), one of the few publishers of Thai Christian books.  Living right next to the seminary campus in downtown Bangkok, both Karl and Sun have opportunities to invest in the lives of students, the next generation of Thai church leaders.  They are also involved in a new church plant called Grace City Bangkok, and Karl does itinerant preaching at various churches in the Bangkok area and beyond.

During 2017, Karl and Sun are on home assignment (furlough) in the United States.

Thailand Ministry Photos 2006 to 2010

This is an album of photos from our first full missionary term in Thailand, from 2006-2010.  Included are pictures of where we lived, daily activities, people whom we knew and worked with, outreach events, church, Thai Buddhism, Thai culture.

 

Click on any picture to see a larger image.

 

When the bigger picture pops up, you can scroll through the whole album by hitting your right arrow key (and left arrow key if you want to go back) 

 

 

 

 

Should We Dump Foreign Missionaries in Favor of Native Missionaries?

Should We Dump Foreign Missionaries in Favor of Native Missionaries?

In recent years, there has been a trend for some missions supporters and churches in the West to move away from sending their own missionaries in favor of supporting “native missionaries.”   The logic goes something like this: “Why pay $60,000/year or more to support a family of American missionaries who will struggle to learn language and culture when you can support a native missionary who knows the language and culture already for $50/month?”  At first glance this seems like a great idea.  And in some places it might be.  But there are other factors at play when deciding to support a missionary from your home country or someone more “local.”  

The historical, cultural, religious, and economic situation varies greatly from country to county and not all non-Western nations can be lumped together when evaluating whether foreign missionaries are still need. In this post, I want to look at several questions that can help us evaluate whether missionaries are really needed (or wanted) in a given location. I will use Thailand as a case study since it is the context that I am most familiar with.

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First Words & Ketchup

Do you know what a TCK is? TCK means third culture kid and is coming to replace the term MK (missionary kid). Joshua is a TCK. A TCK is a kid who grows up somewhere between one culture and another, not really feeling fully at home in any culture. Along these lines, Joshua is making an interesting beginning in life as he interacts with us and the world around him here in Thailand.We are still waiting for his first English words but he has a few Thai words that are very clear and very frequent. Although we think he has said "Dad", "ball", "amen" and "book", all of these have been one time occurrences. His favorite word is "nam" which is the Thai word for water. However, he uses it not only when he wants water, but when he wants milk, or grilled pork sticks, or sticky rice, or that tasty cherry children's Tylenol, or the toy we stuck

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Introducing the Thai Missions Digital Library

Introducing the Thai Missions Digital Library

One of the various projects that I am involved in is the Thai Missions Digital Library.  The library is located at www.thaimissions.info and includes a ton of books, theses, dissertation, articles, blogs, maps, and weblinks about doing missions in Thailand.  Everything on the site is on PDF and free for download.

 

If you haven't checked out the Thai Missions Library yet, watch this short video showing you how to use it and what's there. If you have any questions, Erwin Kint and I are in charge of collecting and cataloging articles and social media, and Dwight Martin at Biblionics in Chiang Mai handles the technical website end of things. 

 

If you don't see a video above, click here to watch it on YouTube

 

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Why Thai Churches Don’t Send Missionaries

Why Thai Churches Don’t Send Missionaries

Today I asked the students in my world missions class if their home churches send out missionaries.  They looked at each other, then looked at me and said, “Uh, no.”  Granted, my class was only 13 students but from what I have observed in Thai churches, sending out cross-cultural missionaries is on nobody’s priority list.  Thankfully, there are some Thai missionaries. Unfortunately, I can count all of them on one hand.  Why is this?  Why is it that a country that has received thousands of missionaries over the years hardly sends out any of its own?

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Book Review: "Church Planting Movements" by David Garrison

Book Review: "Church Planting Movements" by David Garrison

reviewed by Jackson Wu

David Garrison, Church Planting Movements: How God is Redeeming a Lost World. Midlothian, VA: Wigtake, 2004.

David Garrison’s Church Planting Movements examines many of the common features and practices that have led hundreds of thousands of people across the world to profess a faith in Jesus. In the book, he characterizes a CPM (“Church Planting Movements”), as “. . . a rapid multiplication of indigenous church planting churches that sweeps through a people group or population segment” (21). More than a mere study, the book’s triumphal tone conveys the intention to promote the idea that right vision and methodology make this God-sized work not only possible but perhaps even probable since, it is implied, CPMs are “God’s ideal” (297).

Positively, Garrison recounts a number of characteristics that have shaped CPMs across diverse cultures outside the Western world. Although resembling one another, he helpfully distinguishes CPM thinking from the Church Growth Movement (24–25). Accordingly, readers can better sort out what is empirically and theoretically descriptive of CPMs versus other kinds of methodologies. One strength of the book is that it offers a range of anecdotes from around the globe that represent the type of strategies and responses people have had where mass movements have taken place. Therefore, missiologists can assess the patterns that emerge since CPMs essentially act as large sample cases.

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A Reductionist View of the Great Commission

A Reductionist View of the Great Commission
One of the great strengths of evangelical missions today is evangelism.  If you read the literature, follow the blogs, and listen to the conversations, everyone is talking about how to find quicker, better, more contextualized methods of evangelism.  After all, isn’t that what the Great Commission is all about? (Matt. 28:19)I love evangelism. But the longer I spend on the mission field, the more I believe that in all our zeal to fulfill the Great Commission, evangelical missions often fails to take seriously the entirety of what Jesus told his disciples in Matt 28:18-20.  If we were to reverse engineer what many missionaries do in order to discover how they understand the Great Commission, it might read something like this:“And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples converts of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you just enough to be a good church member and avoid falling into blatant immorality. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

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Aung San Suu Kyi Praises Missionary Work in Burma

Aung San Suu Kyi Praises Missionary Work in Burma

It is often said that missionaries destroy native cultures.  In light of that claim, I find it very significant that Burmese democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi takes a positive view of missionaries in her country.  In fact, she spends quite a bit of time in the following video singing the praises of Adoniram JudsonIn sum, she says that American missionaries (especially Judson) did a lot of good for Burma in terms of education, medicine and preserving Burmese culture.  Judson wrote the first Burmese-English dictionary, and the first college in Burma was named Judson College.  The difference between Baptist and Catholic schools in Burma is that American Baptists sought to preserve Burmese culture in their schools.  Students wore Burmese dress, retained their Burmese names, and the schools preserved Burmese manners so that their graduates were considered proper, well educated, and aware of Burmese manners of courtesy.  In addition to education, missionaries helped Burma in the area of medicine, in particular she mentions a Seventh Day Adventist Hospital as the best and most well-known after Burma gained independence.

Click here to watch the video on YouTube

 

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Why Ann Judson Didn’t Go Crazy Like Dorothy Carey

Why Ann Judson Didn’t Go Crazy Like Dorothy Carey

When Adoniram and Ann Judson set sail for India in 1812, they had no idea of the hardship that lay ahead of them.  After being denied access to India, they sailed to Burma.  On the way there, their first child was born on the ship.  He was stillborn and buried at sea.  Their second child, Roger, was born in Burma.  He died before his second birthday.  Their third child, Maria, was born while Adoniram was being held in a Burmese death prison under suspicion of being a British spy.  After he was released to interpret between the British and the Burmese, his wife Ann died, and two months later baby Maria followed her to the grave.  Adoniram poured himself into his translation work to drown the pain, but eventually fled to the jungle to live as a recluse, contemplating death.  But he did not go over the brink.  God returned him to useful service in Bible translation and itinerant evangelism, keeping him faithful to the end.  What kept Adoniram and Ann going in the midst of such hardship and repeated devastating loss?  Why did they not go crazy under the pressure and grief like Dorothy Carey did?

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Missions Books Giveaway

Missions Books Giveaway

 

Contest is now over.  The two winners have been notified via email.  Thank you to everyone who participated! 

 

I love getting good resources into the hands of people who can use them so I am running a missions books giveaway for three quality missions books.  I will select two winners from everyone who enters and each person will receive a set of these three books.“Help, My Halo is Slipping” by Larry DinkinsExtremely readable little book (about 100 pages) about Larry Dinkins and his family’s life as new missionaries in Thailand in the 1980s.   Things in Thailand have changed somewhat in the thirty years since this was written, but it still gives a very good picture of life on the mission field, especially in Thailand. (Larry has written a number of guest posts on my blog, which you can see here)

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Reaching Out to Thai Expats in Australia

Reaching Out to Thai Expats in Australia

guest post by Johan LinderWhen I applied to become a missionary to unreached people groups, I never thought that I would be doing that work in my home town. My wife and I worked in Thailand for 14 years among Thai Buddhist people, both in a country town and in the capital city of Bangkok. We learned the language, lived among the people and adapted to many aspects of Thai culture. When we needed to return 4 years ago I expected that our time of reaching out to the Thai had come to an end. That was until I discovered that in my home city there are over 30,000 Thai people, and I saw that there was great potential to reach out to them. So when I returned home I teamed up with other Christians who were keen on reaching out to the Thai expats in Sydney. We taught English classes, went on outings together, organized parties and get-togethers. It was not long before some of the Thai responded to Christ and gave their lives to him. At this point we decided to start a Thai Christian Fellowship on Monday evenings to disciple and encourage these new believers, as well as other Thai people who were already followers of Jesus. It has been a privilege and a joy to continue on from the ministry we had over many years in Thailand.

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Book Review: "Worship and Mission After Christendom" by Alan and Eleanor Kreider

Book Review: "Worship and Mission After Christendom" by Alan and Eleanor Kreider

Alan and Eleanor Kreider, Worship and Mission After Christendom.  Scottsdale, Ariz.: Herald Press, 2011, 322 pp.

 

reviewed by Karl DahlfredAre worship and mission doomed to be in never-ending competition for the time and resources of the church?  Must we choose between looking inward and looking outward?  In “Worship and Mission After Christendom”, Alan and Eleanor Kreider give a resounding “NO”, pointing readers to a third way of looking at the relationship between worship and mission in light of the demise of Christendom in the West.

 

Raised on the mission field in Asia, Alan and Eleanor Kreider served as Mennonite missionary teachers in England for thirty years before returning to the United States, where they continue their work teaching, speaking and writing about issues of worship, church history, and peace making.  In “Worship and Mission After Christendom”, the Kreiders bring together the results of their studies in these areas, together with personal experience to present an alternative vision of the relationship between worship and mission.  

 

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Gospel Resources for the Global Diaspora

Gospel Resources for the Global Diaspora

As people move around the globe like never before, there are unprecedented opportunities to share the Gospel.  Many new immigrants to the West are from Buddhist, Muslim, Hindu, and other non-Christian backgrounds.  Some of them speak English well.  Some don’t.  How will they hear the Gospel?One solution is diaspora ministry.  The term “diaspora” is used by many missionaries to refer to people from traditional missionary-receiving nations who now live in traditional missionary-sending nations.  So that means reaching out to Thai people in Sydney, and Chinese in Munich.  Missionaries working in diaspora ministries are often those who had been “out there” on the mission field, working with XYZ people group, but have had to return to their home country.  They still have a burden to see XYZ people know Christ, so they do diaspora ministry to reach out to XYZ people living in their home country.  But, as you might imagine, the problem is that there are not enough diaspora workers to go around.

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Book Review: “Filling up the Afflictions of Christ" by John Piper

Book Review: “Filling up the Afflictions of Christ" by John Piper

John Piper, Filling up the Afflictions of Christ: The Cost of Bringing the Gospel to the Nations in the Lives of William Tyndale, John Paton, and Adoniram Judson (The Swans Are Not Silent).  Wheaton, Ill., Crossway Books, 2009, pp.128.

It usually takes me forever to finish a book.  Not because I don’t like reading.  But because I am a slow reader.  So I was shocked when I picked up “Filling up the Afflictions of Christ” and finished it in less than three days.  I couldn’t put it down.  And this after I had been warned by another missionary that it was a scary book.

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Desperate for Co-Workers

Desperate for Co-Workers

Many missionary reports from the field are positive, and filled with joy for what God is doing and hope for what He might do.  But a longing of the missionary heart that rarely appears in letters home is the desperate yearning for more co-workers to join them on the field.  Of course, missionaries mention the need for more workers, but they often do not fully express the sense of isolation that occurs when one is on their own in the work for years at a time.This yearning was narrated quite well in a letter from a friend who recently returned from an short-term exploratory trip to a Muslim majority country.  He is planning to return there long-term and was visiting various missionaries to find out where he might fit best.  I am grateful that he has granted permission for me to reproduce the following excerpt:

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Should Missionaries Stop Sending Paper Prayer Letters?

Should Missionaries Stop Sending Paper Prayer Letters?

I recently read a rather provocatively titled blog post, "Dear Missionary, Please Stop Sending Prayer Letters. Sincerely, The 21st Century”.  The article was a bit over the top but does raise a valid question that many missionaries and their supporters have been wondering in recent years: In the age of email and social media, should missionaries start sending their prayer letters by email only?  Isn't it a waste of paper and money to send out old fashioned hard copy prayer letters?  Well, maybe. But maybe not.

 

Every once in a while, I get an email from a supporter asking me to stop sending them the hard copy of their prayer letter because they already get it through email.  I am happy to oblige and inform our mission organization to take such-and-such supporter off the list.  I don't want to send people stuff they don't want.  However, as I see it, different people want things different ways. 

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Can Missionaries in Creative Access Nations use Social Media?

Can Missionaries in Creative Access Nations use Social Media?

In response to my post “Should Missionaries Use Facebook and Twitter?”, some missionaries in creative access nations (CANs) have pointed out that I neglected to include one major negative of using social media: Security.  They have told me, in so many words, “Nice post, but that’s all irrelevant for us because we can’t use it.”For those working in creative access (i.e. communist, totalitarian, or Muslim) countries, it is imperative that their missionary identity be downplayed or hidden from the general public to ensure their continued ability to do their ministry.  If identifying information about them and their ministry was publicly available online, then they would run a high risk of being either kicked out of the country, blacklisted by the people they are trying to reach, or even killed.  You can see why a Facebook fan page with a big picture of their face would be a negative.

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Ask Your Missionaries Awkward Questions

Ask Your Missionaries Awkward Questions

One of the things that I love about being on home assignment is the questions that people ask.  When we are thousands of miles away on the mission field, there are some questions that people wonder about but wouldn’t email us or call us to ask.  But when you see people face to face, questions come up that would otherwise remain unspoken.We were recently asked, in so many words, “Is it really cost effective to send American missionaries?  It would seem to be better stewardship of God’s money to support many native workers for the same amount that it costs to send you.”  The woman who asked was very concerned that she didn’t hurt us as she knows that our missionary call is very close to our heart.  But it was a nagging question that she had been thinking about and she wants to be a good steward of the resources that God has given to her.

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